SCARS™ Special Report: U.S. FBI Reported Cybercrimes Passes 5 Million

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SCARSSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS.™ Special Report: U.S. FBIFBI FBI - Federal Bureau of Investigation The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States and its principal federal law enforcement agency. Operating under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Justice, the FBI is also a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community and reports to both the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence. A leading U.S. counter-terrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal investigative organization, the FBI has jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crimes, including financial fraud. Reported CybercrimesCybercrimes Cybercrime is a crime related to technology, computers, and the Internet. Typical cybercrime are performed by a computer against a computer, or by a hacker using software to attack computers or networks. Passes 5 Million

Internet Crime Complaint Center Marks 20 Years And More Than 5 Million Reports

From Early Frauds to Sophisticated Schemes, IC3 Has Tracked the Evolution of Online Crime

NOTE: IT IS ESTIMATED CYBERCRIMECybercrime Cybercrime is a crime related to technology, computers, and the Internet. Typical cybercrime are performed by a computer against a computer, or by a hacker using software to attack computers or networks. VICTIMS ONLY REPORT BETWEEN 3% TO 5% OF ALL SCAMSScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. AND CYBERCRIMES. THEREFORE THIS NUMBER SHOULD BE MULTIPLIED BY 20X TO GET A REAL SENSE OF THE NUMBER OF CYBERCRIMES OCCURRING.

According to the FBI’s Press Release:

Throughout the 1990s, Americans took to the internet in droves. The decade saw the launch of the first web browsers, the introduction of now ubiquitous search engines, the birth of online commerce, and the ascendance of email as a go-to mode of communication.

As this new landscape bloomed, so did opportunities for criminals. The web offered easy access for cyber actors to target hundreds or even thousands of people at relatively low cost and risk.

When these crimes started occurring more frequently, the public was unsure where to turn for help. “People really didn’t know where to report internet scams or other online fraudulent activity,” said Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) Chief Donna Gregory. “And law enforcement agencies were saying: ‘What do we do with these? How do we handle them?’”

Recognizing the need to collect and assess information on cyber crime, the FBI started the Internet FraudFraud In law, fraud is intentional deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain (money or other assets), or to deprive a victim of a legal right. Fraud can violate civil law (e.g., a fraud victim may sue the fraud perpetrator to avoid the fraud or recover monetary compensation) or criminal law (e.g., a fraud perpetrator may be prosecuted and imprisoned by governmental authorities), or it may cause no loss of money, property, or legal right but still be an element of another civil or criminal wrong. The purpose of fraud may be monetary gain or other benefits, for example by obtaining a passport, travel document, or driver's license, or mortgage fraud, where the perpetrator may attempt to qualify for a mortgage by way of false statements. A fraud can also be a hoax, which is a distinct concept that involves deliberate deception without the intention of gain or of materially damaging or depriving a victim. Complaint Center in May 2000 as a pilot project with the National White Collar Crime Center.

That Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) turns 20 this month. Renamed the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) in 2002, the IC3 logged its 5 millionth complaint in March 2020. All that data has improved the public’s awareness of online crimes and helped the FBI and other law enforcement agencies better address internet-enabled attacks, fraud, thefts, and scams.

U.S. FBI - Federal Bureau of Investigation - Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) Cybercrime Reporting Statistics Through March 12, 2020

U.S. FBI – Federal Bureau of Investigation – Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) Cybercrime Reporting Statistics Through March 12, 2020

Online Crimes Grow More Damaging and Targeted

The crimes cataloged by the IC3 mirror the evolution of the web across two decades—growing in sophistication and number as the internet grows ever more essential to our professional and personal lives.

“The scale, scope, speed, and impact of cyber threats is constantly evolving,” said FBI Cyber Division Assistant Director Matt Gorham. “Criminals are opportunistic, and we’ve seen them rapidly adapt to the cyber environment, creating a variety of schemes to exploit the public and private sector.”

In its first full year of operation, the IC3 logged 49,711 complaints. Most of them revolved around internet auction fraud, non-delivery scams, and the West African letter (yes, that now-infamous message from a prince or princess with an untapped fortune they wanted to share with you).

“People still fall victim to that letter and versions of it,” said Gregory. “We still see scams that involve lotteries or windfalls where the victim just needs to pay what they believe are taxes or some fee to receive the winnings or a share of the fortune.” Of course, there is no windfall to claim after the criminalCriminal A criminal is any person who through a decision or act engages in a crime. This can be complicated, as many people break laws unknowingly, however, in our context, it is a person who makes a decision to engage in unlawful acts or to place themselves with others who do this. A criminal always has the ability to decide not to break the law, or if they initially engage in crime to stop doing it, but instead continues. collects those “fees” or “taxes.”

“The scale, scope, speed, and impact of cyber threats is constantly evolving.” said Matt Gorham, assistant director, FBI Cyber Division

“The more prevailing trend,” said Gregory, who has been with the IC3 since its founding, “is that those early, rudimentary scams have given way to more destructive and costly data breaches and network intrusions, ransomwareRansomware Ransomware is a type of malware from cryptovirology that threatens to publish the victim's personal data or perpetually block access to it unless a ransom is paid. While some simple ransomware may lock the system so that it is not difficult for a knowledgeable person to reverse, more advanced malware uses a technique called cryptoviral extortion. It encrypts the victim's files, making them inaccessible, and demands a ransom payment to decrypt them. In a properly implemented cryptoviral extortion attack, recovering the files without the decryption key is an intractable problem – and difficult to trace digital currencies such as paysafecard or Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies that are used for the ransoms, making tracing and prosecuting the perpetrators difficult. Ransomware attacks are typically carried out using a Trojan virus disguised as a legitimate file that the user is tricked into downloading or opening when it arrives as an email attachment. However, one high-profile example, the WannaCry worm, traveled automatically between computers without user interaction., romance scams, and sophisticated financial crimes like business email compromise.” Criminals still target individuals, but businesses and organizations are becoming more common targets because of the potential of a larger payout.

Losses recorded by the IC3 in recent years reflect the greater financial damage of this evolution. In 2019, victims reported more than $3.5 billion in losses—an average of $7,500 for each of the 467,361 complaints recorded that year. In 2001, the average victim lost $435.

Gregory said “the IC3 has also seen a shift in the types of criminals perpetrating the illegal activity. Many of the criminals now live overseas, and organized crime groups are on the rise.”

“The sophistication of modern online criminals is the most troubling part,” Gregory said. “We used to be able to give people common sense tips to keep them safe; now it is just much harder to tell the real messages and websites from the fake.”

Instead of an impersonal spam message with poor spelling and grammar, the scamScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. may arrive via a well-written email that appears to come from a trusted colleague, business, or vendor.

Another enduring trend revealed in 20 years of crime data is that scammers will take advantage of a moment in time to prey on people who want to help or may need help in the wake of a natural disaster or tragic event.

The Internet Crime Complaint Center saw an uptick in charity and disaster fraud reports around the time of Hurricanes Rita and Katrina and after the Boston Marathon bombings.

In 2008, scammers tried to gather banking information from Americans waiting to receive stimulus checks as the nation slipped into recession.

Now, during the COVID 19 pandemic, scammers are working overtime hawking fake cures and investment schemes, selling protective equipment without the inventory on hand, and looking to take advantage of a more concentrated online presence during increased telework and distance learning arrangements.

“Criminals and scammers go where there is opportunity,” said Gorham. “Right now, they are exploiting a public health emergency to steal from and deceive people who are vulnerable, worried, or seeking vital supplies and assistance.”

“Those early, rudimentary scams have given way to more destructive and costly data breaches and network intrusions, ransomware, romance scams, and sophisticated financial crimes like business email compromise.” said Donna Gregory, chief, IC3

Supporting Investigations

The IC3 collects and reports out its data in an annual report and educates the public by sending out notices about new scams or upticks in certain types of crimes. Its other key role is to support law enforcement. Federal, state, local, and tribal agencies can access the IC3’s data through a secure database.

“The IC3 was created to provide the public and law enforcement with valuable information collected and analyzed by the FBI.” Gorham stated. “By sharing this information, we hope to protect the American public from becoming victims of cyber crime and enable law enforcement to identify links and trends they may not otherwise be able to see.”

Gregory also points to how IC3 data has helped improve the FBI’s response to frauds carried out online. “We were seeing victims losing a lot of money, mostly through cases of business e-mail compromiseBusiness E-mail Compromise This financial fraud targets businesses engaged in international commerce. Scammers gain access to company e-mail and trick employees into sending money to a “supplier” or “business partner” overseas.,” she said. “Initially we were able to work with financial institutions to examine wires going to international banks. Once we saw success in stopping some of those transactions, the criminals shifted to domestic accounts.”

Gregory said money mulesMoney mules Money mules are a type of money laundering where a person transfers illicit funds through a medium (such as a bank account) to obfuscate where the money came from. There are different types of money mules including witting, unwitting, and complicit. play a huge role in dividing up stolen money into U.S. accounts before moving it overseas. Money mules are people who allow criminals to use their bank accounts to launder illicitillicit Illicit means something that is not legally permitted or authorized under the law; unlicensed; unlawful. It can also mean disapproved of or not permitted for moral or ethical reasons. funds—either because they are receiving a commission for the service or because they trust the person asking for access to their account.

“Law enforcement could not keep up as the money started moving through U.S. accounts,” Gregory said. “By the time they could take action, it was too late. So we started to look into working directly with the banks to stop the money flow and give law enforcement time to do the investigation.”

In 2018, the FBI created the Recovery Asset Team to streamline communication with financial institutions and FBI field offices to halt fraudulent transactions faster. The team successfully recovered more than $300 million for victims in 2019.

After 20 years with the IC3, Gregory has learned “that the online environment will continue to change and that the criminals will adapt along with it.” She worries about the trends she’s seeing in manipulated photos and videos but can never be certain where the next threat will emerge. “The only things that are certain is that the IC3 will continue to evolve as well, finding new and better ways to warn and protect the public from cyber scams and support law enforcement as they combat the threat.”

Reporting To The FBI

To report a crime or see the IC3’s annual reports and warnings about current crimes, scams, and frauds, visit ic3.gov.

Also, remember to report scams on www.Anyscam.com for worldwide distribution through the SCARS|CDN Cybercrime Data Network.

 

 

TAGS: SCARS, Important Article, Information About Scams, Anti-Scam, Scams, Scammers, Fraudsters, Cybercrime, Crybercriminals, Scam Victims, Money Recovery, Asset Recovery, IC3, FBI, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Online Crimes, Reporting Scams, Reporting Online Fraud, Reporting Cybercrime, Reporting Cybercriminals

SCARS the Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Incorporated

SCARS™ Editorial Team
Society of Citizens Against Relationship ScamsSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS. Inc.
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FAQ: How Do You Properly Report Scammers?

It is essential that law enforcement knows about scams & scammers, even though there is nothing (in most cases) that they can do.

Always report scams involving money lost or where you received money to:

  1. Local Police – ask them to take an “informational” police report – say you need it for your insurance
  2. U.S. State Police (if you live in the U.S.) – they will take the matter more seriously and provide you with more help than local police
  3. Your National Police or FBI « www.IC3.gov »
  4. The SCARS|CDN™ Cybercriminal Data Network – Worldwide Reporting Network on « www.Anyscam.com »

This helps your government understand the problem, and allows law enforcement to add scammers on watch lists worldwide.


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To learn more about SCARS visit « www.AgainstScams.org »

Please be sure to report all scammers
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