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Find Real ScammerScammer A Scammer or Fraudster is someone that engages in deception to obtain money or achieve another objective. They are criminals that attempt to deceive a victim into sending more or performing some other activity that benefits the scammer. & Fake Stolen Photos On ScamsONLINE.org
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Warning: Scammers Are Impersonating The U.S. Government More Than Ever!

The holiday season revealed an increase in government impersonator scamsGovernment Impersonator Scams In Government Impersonator Scam, Scammers often disguise themselves as people working for the government and might pretend to offer help. But, are really after your money or personal information. Real government agencies will never call without prior written contact.. Knowing the warning signs will help to reduce vulnerability, and prevent yourself or your friends or family from being scammed.

Government ImposterImposter An impersonator is someone who imitates or copies the behavior or actions of another. There are many reasons for impersonating someone, such as: part of a criminal act such as identity theft, online impersonation scam, or other fraud. This is usually where the criminal is trying to assume the identity of another, in order to commit fraud, such as accessing confidential information or to gain property not belonging to them. Also known as social engineering and impostors. ScamsScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. on the Rise

Courtesy of the United States Army CriminalCriminal A criminal is any person who through a decision or act engages in a crime. This can be complicated, as many people break laws unknowingly, however, in our context, it is a person who makes a decision to engage in unlawful acts or to place themselves with others who do this. A criminal always has the ability to decide not to break the law, or if they initially engage in crime to stop doing it, but instead continues. Investigation Command  (CID)
by Ronna Weyland, Army CID, Quantico, Virginia, United States
Adapted by SCARS

The U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command warns that government impersonator scams are on the rise and is asking the Army community and American public to help the Army maintain its readiness by reporting any and all scams or suspicious activity believed to be a possible scamScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost..

Scammers count on everyday distractions, especially during the holiday season, to prey on unsuspecting people. This time of year scammers are getting creative and finding more opportunities for creating fake offers and phony fraudFraud In law, fraud is intentional deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain (money or other assets), or to deprive a victim of a legal right. Fraud can violate civil law (e.g., a fraud victim may sue the fraud perpetrator to avoid the fraud or recover monetary compensation) or criminal law (e.g., a fraud perpetrator may be prosecuted and imprisoned by governmental authorities), or it may cause no loss of money, property, or legal right but still be an element of another civil or criminal wrong. The purpose of fraud may be monetary gain or other benefits, for example by obtaining a passport, travel document, or driver's license, or mortgage fraud, where the perpetrator may attempt to qualify for a mortgage by way of false statements. A fraud can also be a hoax, which is a distinct concept that involves deliberate deception without the intention of gain or of materially damaging or depriving a victim. alerts by using the reputation of official government officials or agencies. The scammer impersonates a trusted source or vendor to send convincing and malicious emails to individuals in the hopes of gathering personal and financial information.

The scammers will make contact via phone or email and will claim to be affiliated with the government. Criminals are using alert type, pre-recorded messages about compromised social security numbers or how to claim unissued COVID-19 relief checks; tricking recipients into giving up protected information.

“No government agency will send you an unsolicited email or phone call asking for personal information,” said Edward LaBarge, director of CID’s Major CybercrimeCybercrime Cybercrime is a crime related to technology, computers, and the Internet. Typical cybercrime are performed by a computer against a computer, or by a hacker using software to attack computers or networks. Unit. “For the most part, if a government agency is looking to get ahold of you, they will send a letter via the U.S. Postal System on official letterhead.”

Fraudulent “collection agency” or police department calls are also being used by scammers to threaten jail time or legal action if payment or personal information is not provided immediately.

“For someone that lost their job as a result of the pandemic, keeping the lights on is a higher priority than cybersecurity and because of that vulnerability, one may be more apt to fall victim to an unemployment or other type of benefits scam,” said LaBarge.

According to CID officials, many individuals think they can easily detect a scam because they are a government employee, Soldier, contractor, or family member of one of the three. However, this is not always the case.

“No one is immune to becoming a victim of an online scam, it can happen to anyone,” said LaBarge. “When it comes to being a victim, it really comes down to psychology. Cybercriminals thrive during stressful world events such as the pandemic and play on people’s fears, stress, anxiety and vulnerabilities.”

TYPES OF GOVERNMENT IMPERSONATOR SCAMS

Below are scams you may encounter. This list is not meant to be all-inclusive.

Debt Collector

Scammers claim to be affiliated with the government, such as law enforcemen