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SCARSSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS.™ Insight: Helping & Evaluating Older ScamScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. Victims

SCARS strives to help scam victims and their families at the same time. Some of our articles are oriented towards victims, but some victims need broader help when they are unable to access the scam and their risks from future scamsScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost..

In these cases, it is necessary to approach the problem from a different perspective. Not from blamingBlaming Blame or Blaming is the act of censuring, holding responsible, making negative statements about an individual or group that their action or actions are socially or morally irresponsible, the opposite of praise. When someone is morally responsible for doing something wrong, their action is blameworthy. By contrast, when someone is morally responsible for doing something right, we may say that his or her action is praiseworthy. Blame imparts responsibility for an action or act, as in that they made a choice to perform that act or action. the victim, but from understanding some victims need to chose or have chosen for them a different approach to their financial management.

When Grandpa Gave Away the Farm: His Own Darn Fault, or a Case of Elder Abuse?

Cognitive capacity assessment tools can help identify seniors at risk of financial exploitation and equip family, law enforcement, or service providers to intervene.

Older adults can be vulnerable to financial abuse as their cognitive capacity declines. Poor judgment on money matters is hardly confined to one age group, of course. But a line is crossed when manipulative acquaintances (local or online), family members, or complete strangers compromise a senior’s own decision-making acumen.

The U.S. Department of Justice has long targeted elder financial abuse. A significant barrier to identification of such abuse has been difficulty distinguishing older adults’ authentic — even if at times regrettable — financial decision-making from incidents of manipulation by others.

To help separate cases of abuse from the exercise of seniors’ authentic judgment, researchers are crafting social science tools to quantify an individual’s capacity for financial judgment.

Establishing a baseline of a senior’s own cognitive capacity can enable justice system actors, clinicians, and social service providers to pin down, and then act upon, cases of financial abuse of the elderly.

A National Institute for Justice (NIJ) sponsored study led by Peter A. Lichtenberg, a psychology professor at Wayne State University (MI) and an expert in geriatric neuropsychology, has refined and evaluated three tools he developed to measure seniors’ financial judgment:

  1. A financial decision rating scale — a measure of decision-making capacity assessing an individual senior’s actual financial decisions. Expanding on a framework first developed by Lichtenberg’s research team, the comprehensive rating scale consists of 68 items informing financial decision-making.
  2. A financial decision screening scale — a tool to help intervening agencies and fiduciaries assess an individual’s financial decisional capacity and prevent exploitation.
  3. A rating scale for friends and family members — a means to learn from those close to a senior important factual details and impressions that enhance understanding of that person’s decision-making ability.

Access the Interview Tools Here

Lichtenberg has made interview tools available on Older Adult Nest Egg. Free registration and online training are required to access the tools and some are available only to certified mental healthMental health Mental health, defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is "a state of well-being in which the individual