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Overseas Romance ScamsScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. Rising

Official FBIFBI FBI - Federal Bureau of Investigation The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States and its principal federal law enforcement agency. Operating under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Justice, the FBI is also a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community and reports to both the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence. A leading U.S. counter-terrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal investigative organization, the FBI has jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crimes, including financial fraud. Podcast: February 2016

Periodically, as provided by the FBI, we will present a podcast interview with the FBI relating to scams and scammers,

February 10, 2016

Allow a few minutes to download before it starts. If it doesn’t download, you can download the MP3 file here

If You Are A Victim File A Complaint

If You Are A Victim
File A Complaint

Always File A Complaint With Romance Scams Now AND the IC3.gov

TRANSCRIPT:

Mollie Halpern: The FBI says an increasing number of Americans are becoming victims of romance scams originating from West Africa. Perpetrators use legitimate dating websites to defraud people looking for love out of hundreds of thousands of dollars, jewelry, electronics, and even plane tickets. Most of the scams reported to the U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana involve fake personas. Scammers often misrepresent their appearance—using photos that are edited or of others.
 
JD Shamwell is the legal attaché at the U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana. He says victims believe they’ve made a love connection over the computer, only to be devastated later when learning the correspondent doesn’t actually exist.
 
JD Shamwell: The FBI realizes that this is a very delicate situation for a lot of individuals. A lot of individuals who have been victimized truly believe that they are in an actual caring and loving relationship, albeit in a very short period of time.
 
Halpern: Scammers use stories of fake tragedies, medical problems, and other hardships to solicit money. Criminals will use lines like…
 
Shamwell: “I have a business that’s profitable, but I’m lacking certain equipment to make it more profitable. I can assure you that if I can get this equipment, then I can make more money and we can be together.”
 
Halpern: Believing they are in a relationship, some victims break the bank to help their Internet interest. What they’re left with is a broken heart.