Last Updated on by SCARS Editorial Team

Choices: A Cybersecurity Learning Lesson

Guest EditorialGuest Editorial A Guest Editorial is an article written by an outside contributor or author who is not a part of the SCARS Management or SCARS Editorial Team. We allow scam victims and stakeholders to contribute articles, commentary, or editorials for publication on RomanceScamsNOW.com for review and publishing. To submit an article please send it to contact@AgainstScams.org by Brett JohnsonBrett Johnson He is a Cybersecurity, Cybercrime, Fraud, and Identity Theft Expert. Keynote Speaker, Consultant, Writer, Podcast Personality. Former USA Most Wanted Cybercriminal, Identity Thief, Hacker, and Original Internet Godfather. He is also an Advisor to SCARS. Brett is one of the top experts in the world on cybercrime, identity theft, fraud, and cybersecurity. His knowledge is unique. His education in cybercrime does not come from a book, he has hands-on training. His knowledge is from the criminal side of things and has an understanding of cybercrime that the majority of people on the planet will never possess., SCARSSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS. Advisor on CybercrimeCybercrime Cybercrime is a crime related to technology, computers, and the Internet. Typical cybercrime are performed by a computer against a computer, or by a hacker using software to attack computers or networks.

Presented by SCARS

Good Choices / Bad Choices

Every Victim Understands The Role Choices Play In Their Safety & Security – Sadly Governments Do Not Understand This Still To This Day!

In this editorial, Brett Johnson, a member of the SCARS Advisory Board, talks about the choices made by U.S. governments that leave the door wide open for scamsScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. and fraudFraud In law, fraud is intentional deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain (money or other assets), or to deprive a victim of a legal right. Fraud can violate civil law (e.g., a fraud victim may sue the fraud perpetrator to avoid the fraud or recover monetary compensation) or criminal law (e.g., a fraud perpetrator may be prosecuted and imprisoned by governmental authorities), or it may cause no loss of money, property, or legal right but still be an element of another civil or criminal wrong. The purpose of fraud may be monetary gain or other benefits, for example by obtaining a passport, travel document, or driver's license, or mortgage fraud, where the perpetrator may attempt to qualify for a mortgage by way of false statements. A fraud can also be a hoax, which is a distinct concept that involves deliberate deception without the intention of gain or of materially damaging or depriving a victim..

While this may not seem related to our normal topics, it is essential for victims to understand the poor choices being made in local and regional governments. This places us all at risk, and only through voting can we choose smarter people. Cybercrime is near half of all crime now in places like the U.S., Canada, and the United Kingdom. But governments have done such a poor job in tracking this that only the UK really knows for certain its magnitude.

Elections have consequences and we need to choose smarter and more capable instead of politics. We need people that will uphold their oaths and protect their residents. The current crop is clearly lacking in their commitment and choices. But these are people that were chosen in elections – did you vote emotionally? Or did you vote for people that understand how to keep you safe? Next time we all need to choose better!

It is especially important for scamScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. victims to understand their decision-making both before and after their scams. But especially after the scam. Victims continue to make emotion-based decisions which lead to even more problems.

Only by acknowledging our mistakes and honestly assessing our poor choices can we change to make better ones! This is a big part of the reason why we present this. But it is also something that affects not only every American, but these are not unique to the U.S. – politicians around the work keep making bad choices and we keep rewarding them with returning them to office!

We need to make better choices everywhere!


Choices: A Cybersecurity Learning Lesson by Brett Johnson

Published on September 30, 2021, on LinkedIn.com

Fear.

Fear means inaction. Fear means desperation. Fear means poor choices.

Poor Choices:

  • Like States implementing emergency unemployment funds with literally no security in place.
  • Like States giving criminals six months to steal as much money as they could before implementing security on those unemployment funds.

Then more Poor Choices:

Like States hiring a marketing company pretending to be a security company.

Fear caused it. Fear of a collapsing economy. Fear of not being able to get money out to people who needed it. Fear of not being able to stop criminals stealing billions of dollars.

Fear brought desperation. Desperation brought Poor Choices.

Oddly this isn’t another writeup with me slammingSlamming Slamming is when a phone company illegally switches you from your existing phone service company to their own service without your permission, then bills you for service you did not request. ID.meID.me According to the company: ID.me simplifies how individuals prove and share their identity online - it provides secure identity proofing, authentication, and group affiliation verification for government and businesses across sectors. The company’s technology meets the highest federal standards for consumer authentication and is approved as a NIST 800-63-3 IAL2 / AAL2 conformant credential service provider by the Kantara Initiative. ID.me is the only provider with video chat and is committed to “No Identity Left Behind” to enable all people to have a secure digital identity.. I could, easily.

It is that little subconscious editor of mine. Bearded Dude. Chubby. RATM t-shirt and no idea how to use his in-door voice. Yeah, that Dude. He keeps screaming DO IT! ROAST THEM AGAIN! THIS ONE IS EASY!

I refuse. I’ve said all I need to about ID.me. I’ve pointed out the problems. I’ve helped give voice to victims. And I’ve spoken to enough reporters about the matter.

I’m done. No need to continue beating that dead horse.

This piece? This piece is about choices.

Smart Choices or Poor Choices.

Specifically, this is about making the Smart Choice when it comes to cybersecurity.

Paul Eckloff, PR Director at LexisNexis, posted an article published on Tucson.com regarding the unemployment fraud that has been eating the United States alive. Usually, I wouldn’t take the time to read it. I’m aware of the unemployment fraud problem. I know States failed miserably on security. I’m aware many States Chose Poorly when selecting a security company. And I’m more than aware of how much money has been stolen by criminals (which has prompted me to adopt the title of “The Only FraudsterFraudster A Scammer or Fraudster is someone that engages in deception to obtain money or achieve another objective. They are criminals that attempt to deceive a victim into sending more or performing some other activity that benefits the scammer. to Go Broke During the Pandemic.”)

So no, Virginia—I usually would not read another Unemployment Fraud article.

But Paul included a quote from Haywood Talcove, CEO LexisNexis Special Services and LexisNexis Risk Solutions Government. Talcove referred to Job Posting Scams and stolen identity fraud:

“There isn’t a bank, a financial institution, a hotel or an e-retailer that hasn’t solved this.”

That got my attention. Because I agreed with it. Talcove was right.

Thing is? Cybercrime isn’t Rocket Science. It isn’t sophisticated. Attackers don’t tend to be computer geniuses or criminalCriminal A criminal is any person who through a decision or act engages in a crime. This can be complicated, as many people break laws unknowingly, however, in our context, it is a person who makes a decision to engage in unlawful acts or to place themselves with others who do this. A criminal always has the ability to decide not to break the law, or if they initially engage in crime to stop doing it, but instead continues. masterminds.

Talcove knows that. His remark shows it.

I read the article.

Inside? A learning lesson. A lesson about the Smart Choices and Poor Choices of Cybersecurity.

Much of the article was about how crooks had defrauded the ID.me system by tricking real people into verifying themselves. I detail such in my Open Letter to ID.me. It’s a Nifty trick. Not complicated. Not difficult. Just a basic Social EngineeringSocial Engineering Social engineering is the psychological manipulation of people into performing actions or divulging confidential information. It is used as a type of confidence trick for the purpose of information gathering, fraud, or system access, it differs from a traditional "con" in that it is often one of many steps in a more complex fraud scheme. It has also been defined as "any act that influences a person to take any action that may or may not be in their best interests." Scam. But a very successful basic Social Engineering Scam.

Talcove talks about the scam. Everyone knows it was successful—criminals, security companies, news media, State unemployment offices. Hell, even ID.me knows it was successful. Talcove then says what really needs said:

“There isn’t a bank, a financial institution, a hotel, or an e-retailer that hasn’t solved this. Identity verification tools in the private sector can actu