Last Updated on by SCARS Editorial Team

SCARSSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS.™ Guide: Fraudsters Targeting Online Gamers

Don’t Let FraudFraud In law, fraud is intentional deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain (money or other assets), or to deprive a victim of a legal right. Fraud can violate civil law (e.g., a fraud victim may sue the fraud perpetrator to avoid the fraud or recover monetary compensation) or criminal law (e.g., a fraud perpetrator may be prosecuted and imprisoned by governmental authorities), or it may cause no loss of money, property, or legal right but still be an element of another civil or criminal wrong. The purpose of fraud may be monetary gain or other benefits, for example by obtaining a passport, travel document, or driver's license, or mortgage fraud, where the perpetrator may attempt to qualify for a mortgage by way of false statements. A fraud can also be a hoax, which is a distinct concept that involves deliberate deception without the intention of gain or of materially damaging or depriving a victim. Ruin Your Fun – SCARS Warns Against Scammers Targeting Online Gamers!

This is a warning for parents and online gamers themselves of the risk of fraud involving Steam Cards and Fortnite.

  • In the United Kingdom, U.K. Police report that between 1 April 2017 and 31 March 2018, they received reports of Fortnite related fraud, with an average of £146 per victim.
  • In the same period, the U.K. Police received reports of Steam Card fraudCard Fraud Card Fraud is one of the most commonly referenced fraud definitions. It occurs when a fraudster uses a card (debit or credit) to make a purchase without the authorization of the cardholder. Card fraud can occur in-person or through digital channels., with an average of £123.88 per victim.

While this is just the tip of the iceberg, the real level of scamming associated with online games is staggering and growing. Why? Because game players of every type are far more unsuspecting the potential victims of other types of scamsScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost.. Plus these victims – at least 5 times out of 10 – are children.

HOW IS FORTNITE FRAUD HAPPENING?

According to CNN:

You were just getting used to your kid’s obsession with “Fortnite,” and now, all you hear about is V-Bucks. V-Bucks, like Robux on Roblox, are “Fortnite’s” in-game currency. Players use them to buy the fun “skins” (characters and outfits) and “emotes” (those hilarious dances like “Flossing” and “Take the L”) that kids will say they totally need to make “Fortnite” even cooler. For the record: You don’t need V-Bucks to play “Fortnite,” and if you do spring for them, they cost real money. Also, online scammers are all over V-Bucks.

“Fortnite’s” incredible popularity among kids has made it an easy target for rip-off artists trying to make some actual bucks while the game is hot. A recent study from online security company ZeroFox discovered more than 4,700 fake “Fortnite” websites, and the company sent out more than 50,000 security alerts about “Fortnite” scams in a single month. Kids are particularly vulnerable to requests to turn over personal information, including names and email addresses or even credit card numbers. Here’s how you can spot the scamScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. and protect your kids.

What To Watch Out For

V-Bucks generators. “V-Bucks generators” are one of the biggest online “Fortnite” scams. These are often websites that offer people points for watching or clicking on ads, and these points can supposedly be traded in for free V-Bucks within “Fortnite.” Not only do these free V-Bucks never appear, these sites often try to collect people’s Fortnite usernames and passwords or have them take surveys where they submit personal data under the pretense of verifying that they’re human.

Fake Domains

Similar to V-Bucks generators, there are also tons of sites that offer free V-Bucks or trick people into buying fake ones. These fake domains mimic developer Epic Games’ and Fortnite’s real styles, colors, and fonts to fool people. Some even put “Fortnite” in the URL. These sites also collect personal information, but they often go a step further indirectly charging a credit card or bank account.

Social Media Scams

One of the most popular ways that scams are spread is through social media. Fake sites and V-Bucks generators often encourage people to share their links to get more points, which helps expose the scam to more people. Plus, these links often direct users to suspicious