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SCARS|RSN™ Insight: What Does The FBI’s IC3.gov Actually Do?

The FBI’s IC3 Accepts Online Internet Crime Complaints From Either The Actual Victim Or From A Third Party To The Complainant

They say that they can best process a complaint if they receive accurate and complete information from the person making the report. They request people provide the following information when filing a complaint:

  • Victim’s name, address, telephone, and email
  • Financial transaction information (e.g., account information, transaction date and amount, who received the money)
  • Subject’s name, address, telephone, email, website, and IP address
  • Specific details on how you were victimized
  • Email header(s)
  • Any other relevant information you believe is necessary to support your complaint

Sadly, most FBI IC3.gov reports are not investigated, but they are kept for later use if there is a need.

But What Is IC3.gov?

IC3.gov is a collection point for online crime reports.

U.S. FBI IC3.gov Core Functions

U.S. FBI IC3.gov Core Functions

It collects information and then stores it in a closed database accessible to the FBI. But there is a problem, namely that the FBI does not really share information with other agencies unless they ask for it. Unfortunately, others do not know it exists so cannot ask for it.

Also, it is NOT the only place reports must be made. The first place to report these crimes if you lost money is your Local Police so you can include the police report number in your IC3 complaint. Then, also report the crime on www.Anyscam.com so it goes global over the SCARS|CDN Cybercrime Data Network -the SCARS Anti-Scam Data Reporting Network that goes out of over 1,000 entities around the world.

IC3 It is not an investigative service. Only if enough information is collected can the FBI itself step in and act. And even then, they are limited by international law and treaties.

However, Most Victims Blame The FBI For Not Doing Anything, Yet They Do Exactly What They Say They Will Do

As we have presented over and over, they do quite a lot. They just don’t do what many victims want them to do. Which is rush right out and arrest scammers. Part of the reason for that is the quality of the information provided to them.

Their job is to collect the information so the U.S. Government can make accurate threat assessments and prioritize actions. But still to this dat, with all the recent successes at arresting scammers in 2018, most victims still do not report. It is estimated that only 3-5% is reported by victims, the other simply do not bother. So that the United States Government assessments are significantly distorted and underestimated by at least 95%.

At lot is being done constantly. In 2018 more than 20,000 scammers and mules have been arrested.

The reason so little is done? Because victims (95% of them) do not report!.

If You Want The Recent Trends To Continue Then You Have To Do Your Part!

SCARS the Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Incorporated

 
SCARS|RSN™ Team

A SCARS Division
Miami Florida U.S.A.

 

FBI IC3.gov Frequently Asked Questions

Prior To Filing A Complaint

Q: Who should file a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3)?
You may file a complaint with the IC3 if you believe you have been the victim of an Internet crime or if you want to file on behalf of another person you believe has been such a victim.
Q: What details will I be asked to include in my complaint?
The IC3’s ability to process your complaint will be based upon the accuracy and completeness of the information provided. The following is the type of information we ask for in the complaint form:
  • Victim’s name, address, telephone, and email
    • This will be your information if you are the victim, or another person if you are filing on behalf of a third party
  • Financial transaction information (e.g., account information, transaction date and amount, who received the money)
  • Subject’s name, address, telephone, email, website, and IP address
    • The subject is the person/entity allegedly committing the Internet crime
  • Specific details on how you were victimized
  • Email header(s)
  • Any other relevant information you believe is necessary to support your complaint
Q: How does the IC3 define Internet crime?
Internet crime includes any illegal activity involving one or more components of the Internet, such as websites, chat rooms, and/or email. Internet crime involves the use of the Internet to communicate false or fraudulent representations to consumers. These crimes may include, but are not limited to, advance-fee schemes, non-delivery of goods or services, computer hacking, or employment/business opportunity schemes.
Q: Can I file a complaint if I am a citizen of the United States but have been victimized by an individual or company outside of the United States?
If either the victim or the alleged subject of the Internet crime is located within the United States, you may file a complaint with the IC3
Q: Can I file a complaint if I have been victimized by an individual or company in the United States, but I am not a citizen of the United States?
Yes, if either you or the alleged subject of the Internet crime is located within the United States, regardless of citizenship, you may file a complaint with the IC3.

After A Complaint Is Filed

Q: What happens after I file a complaint?
Trained analysts at the IC3 review and research the complaints, disseminating information to the appropriate federal, state, local, or international law enforcement or regulatory agencies for criminal, civil, or administrative action, as appropriate.
Q: When will I be updated on the status of the investigation of my complaint?
After you file a complaint with the IC3, the information is reviewed by an analyst and forwarded to federal, state, local, or international law enforcement or regulatory agencies with jurisdiction. The IC3 does not conduct investigations and, therefore, is not able to provide the investigative status of a previously filed complaint. Investigation and prosecution is at the discretion of the receiving agencies.
Q: Will I be informed that my complaint was received successfully?
Once you file a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), you will receive the following message at the top of your filed complaint:

Thank you for submitting your complaint to the IC3. Please save or print a copy for your records. This is the only time you will have to make a copy of your complaint.

Q: How do I cancel my complaint that I filed?
Once a complaint has been filed with the IC3, it cannot be canceled.

Related Evidence

Q: Should I retain evidence that supports my complaint or send it to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3)?
IC3 does not collect evidence regarding complaints. While you may cut and paste information into your complaint (e.g., email headers), you must be sure to keep all original documents in a secure location. In the event that a law enforcement or regulatory agency opens an investigation, they may request the information directly from you.
Q: What type of information would possibly be considered evidence in regard to my complaint?
It is important that you keep any evidence you may have related to your complaint. Evidence may include, but is not limited to, the following:
  • Canceled checks
  • Credit card receipts
  • Money order receipts
  • Certified or other mail receipts
  • Wire receipts
  • Virtual currency receipts
  • Pre-paid card receipts
  • Envelopes (if you received items via FedEx, UPS, or U.S. Mail)
  • Facsimiles
  • Pamphlets or brochures
  • Phone bills
  • Printed or preferably electronic copies of emails (if printed, include full email header information)
  • Printed or preferably electronic copies of web pages
  • Hard drive images
  • PCAP files containing malicious network traffic
  • Network, host system, and/or security appliance logs
  • Copies of malware
  • Chat transcripts and/or telephony logs

Keep items in a safe location in the event you are requested to provide them for investigative or prosecutive evidence.

Urgent Complaints

Q: Can I file a complaint if I have been threatened over the Internet via email, chat room, website, etc?
If you or someone else is in immediate danger, please call 911 or your local police.
Q: What should I do if I believe my complaint is time sensitive?
After you file a complaint with the IC3, the information is reviewed by an analyst and forwarded to federal, state, local, or international law enforcement or regulatory agencies with jurisdiction. As investigation and prosecution is at the discretion of the receiving agencies, please contact local law enforcement directly if you believe your matter is time sensitive.

Terrorist Tips

Q: Where should I submit information relating to possible terrorist activity?
To submit possible terrorist information, please visit the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s website and submit a tip.

Disclosure of Information

Q: What information can the Internet Crime Complaint Center provide regarding the legitimacy of a company?
The IC3 cannot provide information on a specific company. The IC3 serves as the FBI’s central repository for the collection of Internet crime complaints.
Q: What information can the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) provide if I think that a complaint has been filed against myself or company?
The IC3 is not a resource available to the general public for answering questions arising from the complaint information it receives. IC3 does not release information about specific complaints and/or the resolution of those complaints. Therefore, IC3 is unable to provide you with such information.

Spam Emails

Q: Is there an email address I can forward SPAM emails that I receive?
The IC3 does not have an email address established for the receipt of such information. When filing a complaint at the IC3, be sure to copy and paste the entire email, including the header information, in the complaint.

Media

Q: Who do I contact if I am a member of the media wishing to speak with a member of your press office?
Contact your local FBI office.

Employment

Q: Where can I find out about employment opportunities with the Internet Crime Complaint Center?
For employment opportunities with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), please visit the FBI’s website.

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FAQ: How Do You Properly Report Scammers?

It is essential that law enforcement knows about scams & scammers, even though there is nothing (in most cases) that they can do.

Always report scams involving money lost or where you received money to:

  1. Local Police – ask them to take an “informational” police report – say you need it for your insurance
  2. Your National Police or FBI (www.IC3.gov)
  3. The SCARS|CDN™ Cybercriminal Data Network – Worldwide Reporting Network HERE or on www.Anyscam.com

This helps your government understand the problem, and allows law enforcement to add scammers on watch lists worldwide.

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Visit our NEW Main SCARS|RSN Facebook page for much more information about scams and online crime: www.facebook.com/RSN.Main.News.And.Inromation.Home.Page

 

To learn more about SCARS visit www.AgainstScams.org

Please be sure to report all scammers HERE or on www.Anyscam.com

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SCARS|RSN™ Insight: What Does The FBI's IC3.gov Actually Do? 1

 

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All original content is Copyright © 1991 – 2018 SCARS All Rights Reserved Worldwide & Webwide. Third-party copyrights acknowledge.

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SCARS|RSN™ RomanceScamsNow.com™ is the official knowledge and victims' support publication of the Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams™ Incorporated [SCARS]™ It is edited and published by the SCARS|RSN Team, a division of SCARS. SCARS is the world's leading anti-scam charitable nonprofit nongovernmental organization, based in Miami Florida U.S.A. Its founder has been involved in combating online fraud since 1991. SCARS™ - the Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. is a charitable nonprofit nongovernmental organization (NGO) dedicated to advocating victim's causes and changing government and law enforcement attitudes toward online fraud for good! Please join us in becoming a member of SCARS - it's free! Add your voice so that the world will listen at last - just go to www.AgainstScams.org. The SCARS|RSN website and all of our publications (including social media) are maintained by our own staff employees and volunteers to provide you the most up to date information about scams & scammers from around the world. We show you how to avoid them or recover from them. SCARS is the only registered online crime victims' assistance & support organization in the world. Be sure to report scammers here. Also, visit our main Facebook page for more information about romance scams.