Spotting Nigerian Scammers – Nigerian Phrases

Spotting Nigerian Scammers – Nigerian Phrases

Understanding ScammerScammer A Scammer or Fraudster is someone that engages in deception to obtain money or achieve another objective. They are criminals that attempt to deceive a victim into sending more or performing some other activity that benefits the scammer. Culture

A SCARSSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS. Guide

Most Victims Stay In A ScamScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. Far Too Long!

This is because while they suspect it is a scam, they do not have the confidence to cut it off.

The reason that they lack confidence is partner because of the extended period of time they were being manipulated, and specifically Gaslighted to undermine their confidence. But it is also because they are looking for concrete proof that it is a scam.

The proof is unnecessary because if you suspect it is a scam – then simply it is! However, for those that cannot accept this simple fact, the following will help trap scammers into giving away their Nigerian origins.

Nigerians use a lot of local dialects, slang,  and shorthand words for one another, these words and phrases are not only from their indigenous Nigerian languages but sometimes they are also in Pidgin English or are English terms with the meaning corrupted.

To learn more about how Scammers Use Endearments and Why click here.

How To Use?

Your scammer is going to use texts and email as their primary communication method. This means a mountain of written conversations.

During your conversations, it is easy to slip in certain trap words or phrases into your replies. Most of the time, they will not even be noticed, since they are in their native tongue. When the scammer replies as tough they understood and does not question the word or phrase, you can be sure – at least after a couple of setups that you are speaking with a Nigerian.

Just be careful not to flood the conversation with Nigerian terms. Use one or two in critical passages of text, and see what happens. You can use one or two in each message, but not too many or your scammers will catch on!

Also remember that Nigerian is a country of 206 million people, and has 500 languages, so everything depends on what language they natively speak. Many phrases are universal in Nigeria.

Nigerian Vocabulary

Here is an extensive list of Nigerian Words & Phrases:

  • Aboki (ABO-KI) – Meaning “my friend” this nickname is used to refer to northerners.
  • Agbalagba (AG-BA-LA-GBA) – This Yoruba nickname is used usually to hail people of high financial status and in some cases older people.
  • Agbero­ – This Yoruba nickname is used to refer to street urchins. Although, its correct meaning is for members of the National road transport union workers.
  • Ajebutter (AJE-BUTTER) – This nickname is used for people of the upper class.
  • Alabi Yellow – A popular Yoruba actor; it is used as a nickname used by Yoruba’s for light-skinned people. Similar to Oyinbo.
  • Amebo – This nickname is popularly used for gossips sometimes as a joke, other times as a way to tell them off.
  • Asewo/Ashawo – It means Slut.
  • Attaché – This is a friend who remains your friend simply for the benefits they enjoy receiving from you.
  • Baba – common endearment phrase – instead of Baby
  • Baba Kukuru (Cuckoo-roo) – Yoruba term. It means “Short man.”
  • Baba Nla – Yoruba term. It is similar to the term “Big Boss.”
  • Badoo – It means “Bad Guy.” It is used as a nickname for someone who is cool.
  • Big Boy/Man/Woman – This nickname is often used to refer to anyone who is financially ok.
  • Blackie – If you’re dark-skinned, then you probably would be called blackie this nickname is however not as popular in most parts of Nigeria and it is very rare.
  • Bobo (BO-BO) – This nickname is often used to refer to a chubby child.
  • Boss – This nickname is used among male friends to hail one another.
  • Butty – When a Nigerian calls you butty, it means you must belong to the upper class and or act like one.
  • Capo – A nickname used to refer to cult leaders.
  • Chairman – When a Nigerian calls you chairman; it means they hold you in high regard. This nickname is used by Nigerians to hail friends and acquaintances.
  • Chargie – This nickname has also gained popularity among Nigerian youths, often time used to refer to female partners.
  • Daddy – Similar to mummy, Nigerians also use daddy to refer to a father and attach the names of their children to it such as Daddy Bola, Daddy Ngozi.
  • Efiko/Efiwe – A popular nickname for a brilliant guy.
  • Hood – Home, hometown, area of residence.
  • Fela – The afrobeat legend. A slim person could be called Fela because was slim. But the most popular usage is for a slim person that smokes a lot. Similar to using “Bob Marley” as a nickname.
  • FFO – “For Food Only” this nickname is right for anyone who eats a lot.
  • NFA – It means “No Future Ambition.”
  • Pako – It means “hardened.”
  • Street – Its closest translation would be “Street Smart”
  • G-boy – people who engage in cyber fraudFraud In law, fraud is intentional deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain (money or other assets), or to deprive a victim of a legal right. Fraud can violate civil law (e.g., a fraud victim may sue the fraud perpetrator to avoid the fraud or recover monetary compensation) or criminal law (e.g., a fraud perpetrator may be prosecuted and imprisoned by governmental authorities), or it may cause no loss of money, property, or legal right but still be an element of another civil or criminal wrong. The purpose of fraud may be monetary gain or other benefits, for example by obtaining a passport, travel document, or driver's license, or mortgage fraud, where the perpetrator may attempt to qualify for a mortgage by way of false statements. A fraud can also be a hoax, which is a distinct concept that involves deliberate deception without the intention of gain or of materially damaging or depriving a victim. are called G-boys by Nigerians.
  • IJGB – “I Just Got Back” is a Nigerian nickname for Nigerian returnees from overseas who most times only for the holidays.
  • Igwe – It means King, in Ibo language.
  • Ole – It means thief. Depending on pronunciation, it could also mean laziness in Yoruba.
  • Barawo – It means thief.
  • ITK – “I too know” this nickname is used for overly serious students and those who like to act like they know it all.
  • Kele (KE-LE) – Meaning “girls” this nickname is used to refer to the female gender.
  • Madam – Female bosses are called madam in Nigeria, in some cases “oga madam”.
  • Maga/ Maye – This doesn’t mean “Make America Great Again,” rather it is the word used for victims of internet scamsScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost.. It has evolved to become a nickname for anyone who was scammed.
  • Mallam (Maal-am) – It is an honorific title given to Islamic scholars but it is commonly used by Southerners to refer to Northerners.
  • Marlian – A nickname for fans of popular Nigerian artist Naira Marley. If you’re a Marlian then you are a member of the NBG (No Belt GangGang A gang is normally a group or society of associated criminals with a defined leadership and internal organization that identifies with or claims control over a territory or business practice in a community and engages, either individually or collectively, in illegal, and possibly violent, behavior. Online gangs are not limited by territory and may operate side by side with other gangs while engaging in crime online. Some members of criminal gangs are initiated (by going through a process of initiation), or have to prove their loyalty and right to belong by committing certain acts, usually theft or violence, or rituals. Gangs are usually rougher and more visible than scammer cartels, and more often arrested.).
  • Mummy – Although an English word for mother, Nigerians also use mummy when referring to a mother and usually attach the name of their children behind. For instance, Mummy Bola, Mummy Ngozi.
  • Mumu – It is a mean nickname used to indicate someone isn’t smart or was outsmarted in a situation.
  • Mutu mina (MUTU-MINA) – Meaning “my guy” this nickname is used among friends to hail each other.
  • Oga – This nickname is often used by Nigerians to refer to their bosses.
  • Ogbeni – A Yoruba nickname used to refer to a person.
  • Olosho/Hoeloshfelao – It means Slut.
  • Olowo (OH–LOW-WOE) – It means a rich person.
  • Omoge (HUM-OR-GAY) – Meaning “young lady” a Yoruba nickname for a young woman.
  • Omo-mo – More popular in Benin, it implies “bourgeoisie,” “pampered.”
  • Omo Mummy – “Omo Mummy,” translates to “mummy’s boy.”
  • Ore (OR-RARE) – Meaning “my friend” this Yoruba nickname is also used by friends to refer to each other.
  • Oyinbo – This nickname is used to refer to foreigners especially white people, it is in no way condescending, and instead, it’s simply a sign of familiarity.
  • Pale (PA-LE) – A nickname for father.
  • Popsy / Momsy – Nicknames used by youths to refer to their parents.
  • Sisi (C-C) – It means Lady.
  • Slay Queen/Slay Mama – English equivalent would be “Barbie.”
  • Smallie – Used to refer to people who are smaller in size and height.
  • Smellos – Smellos are generally people who fail to keep up with trends. Who in Nigerian terms “are still sleeping on a bicycle”?
  • Tallie – Nigerians use this nickname to refer to very tall people. This is, however, is just a form of endearment, not body shaming in any way.
  • Tush – This is a nickname used as a description of a refined person.
  • Yellow Pawpaw – This is an affectionate name for really light-skinned Nigerians.

Nigerian Nicknames for Couples

Depending on their tribal nation, couples in Nigeria often refer to themselves using nicknames in their indigenous languages. Here are some Nigerian nicknames for boyfriends, girlfriends, husbands, and wives:

English Romantic Nicknames/Endearments used By Nigerians

  • Baba
  • Babe
  • Boo
  • Dear/My Dear
  • Boyfriend/Girlfriend
  • Honey

Yoruba Pet Names/Endearments

  • Ife miIfe mi means “my love” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: A Gender-neutral Yoruba pet name that can be used for a loved one; boyfriend, girlfriend, or daughter.

  • AyanfeAyanfe means “Beloved” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: Ayanfe is a Gender-neutral Yoruba pet name used by couples; boyfriend, girlfriend, husband, wife, or crush.

  • Ololufe (OLO-LU-FE): Ololufe means “my love” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: Ololufe is a Gender-neutral Yoruba pet name that can be used for a lover; boyfriend, girlfriend, husband, wife, or crush.

  • IyawoIyawo means “wife” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: Iyawo is a feminine Yoruba pet name used for a girlfriend, wife, crush, or even daughter.

  • Aya miAya mi means “my wife” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: Aya Mi has the same meaning as Iyawo. Aya mi is a feminine Yoruba pet name used for a girlfriend, wife, crush, or even daughter.

  • Oko Mi (Oko-MI): Oko Mi means “My Husband” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: Oko Mi, a masculine term, can be used as a Yoruba nickname for a husband, boyfriend, crush, or even Son.

  • Olowo Ori Mi (OLO-WO-ORI-MI): Olowo Ori Mi means “Payer of my bride price” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: Olowo Ori Mi is a masculine term because Men pay the bride price. Olowo Ori Mi is a Yoruba pet nickname that a lady can call a guy she adores; her husband, boyfriend, crush, or son.

  • Alade Ori mi (AL-ADE-ORI-MI): Alade Ori Mi, the Yoruba term of endearment, roughly translates to “owner of my crown.” It is best translated to mean “my King/My Queen.”

Usage: Alade Ori mi is a Gender-neutral Yoruba pet name that can be used for a loved one; boyfriend, girlfriend, husband, wife, son, or daughter.

  • Ewa: Ewa means “beautiful” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: Ewa is a feminine Yoruba pet name that can be used for a loved one; boyfriend, girlfriend, or daughter.

  • Onitemi (O-NI-TE-MI): Onitemi means “Mine” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: A Gender-neutral Yoruba pet name that can be used for a loved one; boyfriend, girlfriend, or daughter.

  • Ododo mi (ODO-DO-MI): Ododo mi means “my flower” in the Yoruba language.

Usage: Ododo mi is a Yoruba pet nickname used by husbands to refer to how precious their wives are to them.

Igbo Pet Names/Endearments

  • Adanma (HARDER-N-MA) – It is similar to calling a lady your “Beautiful princess.”
  • Dim oma (DIM-OMAH) – Meaning “my good husband”, this Igbo nickname is used by wives to describe their loving husband.
  • Usom (USO-M) – Meaning “my sweetie” this Igbo nickname is a form of endearments used by husbands to refer to their wives.
  • Ola edo’m (OLA- EDO-M) – Meaning “my gold”, husbands often use this Igbo nickname to describe how precious their wives are to them.
  • Onyenkem (ONYE-NKEM) – Meaning “my own” this Igbo nickname is used as a form of endearment by husbands to their wives.
  • Nwa nwa (NWA-NWA) – Meaning “baby daddy”, wives use this Igbo nickname as a form of endearment to refer to the father of their children.
  • Obi uto”m (OBI-TO-M) – Meaning “my happiness” this Igbo nickname is used by couples to describe how happy they make each other.
  • Obim (OBI-M) – Meaning “my heart “, Obim is used in the Igbo language by couples to show how much they care about their partner.

Hausa Pet Names/Endearments

  • Zuciyata (ZU-CI-YA-TA) – Meaning “my heart” this Hausa nickname reminds couples of who their hearts belong to.
  • Kambi na (KAMBI-NA) – Meaning “my crown” this Hausa nickname describes wives as the crow of their husbands.
  • Mai Gida (MAI-GI-DA) – Meaning “house head” is often used as an endearing term for husbands in Hausa households.
  • Masoyina (MA-SOY-INAH) – Meaning “My love” this nickname is used by Hausa couples as a declaration of their love for each other.
  • Sonraina (SON-RAY-NA) – Meaning “love of my life” this Hausa nickname is simply a declaration of a couple’s love.
  • Ta wa (TA-WA) – Meaning “mine” this nickname is used among Hausa couples as a reminder that they belong to one another.

Other Nigerian Pet Names/Endearments

  • Adibo (ADI-BOH) – Meaning “paragon of beauty” you can use this Egbema Ijaw nickname for your beautiful wife.
  • Awaan mmi (NW-AN-MI) – Meaning “my wife” husbands use this name to refer to their wives in Ibibio.
  • Dooshima (DO-SHE-MA) – Meaning “love” couple use this Tiv nickname interchangeably to remind themselves of their love for one another.
  • Ebe mmi (EBE-MI) – Meaning “my husband” wives use this name to refer to their husbands in Ibibio.
  • Egbewei (EGBE-WEI) – Meaning “worthy one” use this Egbema Ijaw nickname to remind your partner of how much they mean to you.
  • Eniere (ENI-EREH) – Meaning “my wife” is an Egbema Ijaw nickname for a wife.
  • Enizei (ENI-ZEI) – Meaning “my husband” is an Egbema Ijaw nickname for a husband.
  • Ima Ima (EMAH-EMAH) – Meaning “my love” couples refer to themselves using this name in the Ibibio language.
  • Tor – Meaning “king” this Tiv nickname is a form of affection used by wives to refer to their husbands.
  • Tordue (TORH-DU) – Meaning “king” this Tiv nickname show just how much a wife regards her husband.

For Parents

In Nigerian culture, someone doesn’t have to be a biological parent to answer to a parent’s name. Older people, as a sign of respect, are also referred to in the same way as one would one’s parents.

  • Ada – This name is usually used to refer to the oldest female in an Igbo lineage.
  • Baaba (BA-A-BA) – A nickname used by the Fulani people of Northern Nigeria to refer to one’s father.
  • Baba (BA-BA) – This is a popular nickname for father and has Yoruba origins used in many parts of western Nigeria. Usually, the names are attached to the names of one’s child, for instance; Baba Tola (which means Tola’s father).
  • Baba Oko Mi (BA-BA-OKO-MI) – This is an affectionate nickname used among the Yoruba’s to refer to their father-in-law or the elders in their spouse’s family.
  • Baba Wa (BA-BA-WA) – A nickname among the Yoruba’s for an elderly man. It means “Our Father.”
  • Dau – The Egbema people of Ijaw Nigeria use this name to refer to fathers.
  • Di Okpara (DI-OK-PARA) – This is a name used to refer to the oldest male in an Igbo lineage.
  • Eka – An Efik name of endearment for mother.
  • Esiraado (ESI-RAA-DO) – A nickname for a parent-in-law in Fulfulde (Fulani). The plural form being Esiraabe.
  • Ete – An Efik name of endearment for father.
  • Ezinne (EZIN-NNE) – A nickname for a woman considered to be a good mother to her children among the Igbos of Eastern Nigeria.
  • Iya (E-YA) – This is a popular nickname for mother and has Yoruba origins used in many parts of western Nigeria. Usually, the names are attached to the names of one’s child, for instance; Iya Tola (which means Tola’s mother).
  • Iya Oko Mi (IYA-OKO-MI) – In Nigerian culture, your mother-in-law is often taken as your own mother and this is an affectionate nickname used among the Yoruba’s.
  • Iya Ile (EYA-LE) – An endearing nickname for the eldest wife in a Yoruba household.
  • Iya wa (EYA-WA) – A nickname among the Yoruba’s for an elderly woman in one’s family who might not be one’s mother but considered a mother to all.
  • Ngo – A Tiv name for mother.
  • Nna – Used among the Igbos to refer to a father, for instance, Nna m (means My father) and Nna Chike (which means Chike’s father).
  • Nna Di (NNA-DI) – An Igbo name of endearment for one’s Father-in-law.
  • Nne – An Igbo nickname for a mother, for example, Nne m (means My Mother) and Nne Dozie (which means Dozie’s mother).
  • Ogo Nwanyi (OGO-NWAN-YI) – An Igbo name of endearment for one’s Mother-in-law.
  • Papa – A popular term used to refer to a father.
  • Pale (PAL-HARE) – A slang used for Dad.
  • Male (MAL-HARE)– A slang used for Mom.
  • Suruka (SU-RU-KA) – The Hausa nickname for mother-in-law.
  • Suruki (SU-RU-KI) – The Hausa nickname for father-in-law.
  • Tere – A Tiv name for father.
  • Terem Kem (TERE-M-KEM) – A Tiv name for father-in-law.
  • Uba – A nickname for father among the Hausa people of Northern Nigeria.
  • Wari Okosu Ere (WARI-OKO-SU-ERE) – This name used to refer to the oldest female in a lineage among the Egbema people of Ijaw Nigeria.
  • Wari Okosu Wei (WARI-OKO-SU-WEI) – A name used to refer to the oldest male in a lineage among the Egbema people of Ijaw Nigeria.
  • Yin – The Egbema people of Ijaw Nigeria use this name to refer to mothers.
  • Yumma (YU-MMMA) – A nickname used by the Fulani people of Northern Nigeria to refer to one’s mother.

For Grandparents

Nigerians have separate names they use in referring to their grandparents. These nicknames vary depending on the tribe and language spoken. Here are a few Nigerian nicknames for grandparents:

  • Baba Agba (BA-BA-AG-BA) – A name for a Grandfather used among the Yoruba”s.
  • Eka Eka (EKA-EKA) – This is used by the Efik people to refer to Grandmother.
  • Ete Ete (ETE-ETE) – This Efik name is used to refer to Grandfather.
  • Iya Agba (E-YA-AG-BA) – A name for a Grandmother used among the Yoruba”s.
  • Kakan (KA-KA-N) – A name of endearment used to refer to one’s Grandfather amongst the Hausas of Northern Nigeria.
  • Kakanta (KA-KA-N-TA) – A name of endearment used to refer to one’s Grandmother amongst the Hausas of Northern Nigeria.
  • Mama – In some households, they find it easier to call Grandmothers mama.
  • Ngotamen (NGO-TA-MEN) – Used by the Tiv people to refer to Grandmother.
  • Nna Nna (NNA-NNA) – This name is fondly used to refer to one’s patriarchal Grandfather as a term of endearment among the Igbos of Eastern Nigeria.
  • Nna Nne (NNA-NNE) – This name is fondly used to refer to one’s matriarchal Grandfather as a term of endearment among the Igbos of Eastern Nigeria.
  • Nne Nna (NNE-NNA) – This name is fondly used to refer to one’s patriarchal Grandmother as a term of endearment among the Igbos of Eastern Nigeria.
  • Nne Nne (NNE-NNE) –This name is fondly used to refer to one’s patriarchal Grandfather as a term of endearment among the Igbos of Eastern Nigeria
  • Opu Dan (OP-U-DAN) – This name is used by the Egbema people of Ijaw Nigeria to refer to Grandfathers.
  • Opu Yin (OP-U-YIN) – This name is used by the Egbema people of Ijaw Nigeria to refer to Grandmothers.
  • Pati (PA-TI) – This Fulfude name is used by the Fulani people of northern Nigeria to refer to Grandfather.
  • Soro (SO-RO) – This Fulfude name is used by the Fulani people of northern Nigeria to refer to Grandfather.
  • Tertamen (TER-TAY-MEN) – Used by the Tiv people to refer to Grandfather.

For Places

Here are the terms and nicknames Nigerians use for places or location-related Nigerian nicknames:

  • Naija – The unofficial nickname for Nigeria. Omo Naija (Son of Nigeria), Naija Boy (Nigerian Kid), etc means are derived from this term.
  • IB – Nickname for Ibadan; largest city in Nigeria.
  • LAG – Nickname for Lagos state; the commercial capital of Nigeria.
  • Las Gidi –Nickname for Lagos state.
  • Gidi –Also, a nickname for Lagos state.
  • ABK –Popular nickname used for Abeokuta, a city in Ogun state.
  • ABJ –The unofficial nickname of the capital city of Nigeria.
  • KD – Short form of Kaduna state.
  • PH –Common term used to describe Port Harcourt city.
  • Lagosian – A nickname used for people who are from Lagos state or someone who resides in Lagos.
  • Yankee – USA
  • Jand – UK/ anywhere outside Africa.
  • Southy – South Africa
  • Chinko – Chinese/Asian.

Common Items

Here are the most popular terms Nigerians use daily:

  • Tissue – Toilet Paper.
  • Coke – Soda, Coca Cola.
  • Minerals – Soda.
  • Motor – A vehicle.
  • Plane – Aircraft.
  • Mechanic – An Auto technician that fixes mechanical faults in vehicles.
  • Panel Beater – An Auto technician that fixes auto body damage and dents in vehicles.
  • Rewire – An Auto technician that fixes electrical damage in cars.
  • Hotel – A hotel.
  • Toilet – Restroom.
  • Lift – Elevator. (from the English – Americans never use this term)
  • Cabu Cabu – Rarely used, it means Taxi. Taxi has become a more popular term.
  • Sweet – Candy.
  • Milo/Bournvita – Cocoa Tea. Some people use it as a term for tea.
  • Fridge – Refrigerator
  • Maggi – Bouillon cube
  • Indomie – Noodles
  • Supermarket – Grocery store
  • Biro – Pen.
  • Eatery – Restaurant.
  • Olopa – Yoruba term for the police.
  • Popo – Slang for Police
  • Gateman – Security Personnel.
  • Businessman – Entrepreneur/trader.
  • Chemist – Pharmacy/Pharmacist.
  • AC – Air conditioner
  • Yellow Fever – Traffic Police
  • Yahoo – Refers to internet fraud but you’d find it being used for young people with questionable sources of income.
  • Okada – Commercial motorcycle
  • Keke – Bicycle, tricycle.
  • Danfo – Commercial Bus.
  • BRT – Mass transit buses.

More …

If you encounter more Nigerian terms or phrases that you find being used by Nigerian Scammers in their regular conversation please tell us in a comment below!

NOTE: we have not included scammer slang – terms they use among themselves when talking about scams or their victims. Those would be too obvious and are better ignored.

Essential Tools For Every Scam Victim From SCARS Publishing

Visit shop.AgainstScams.org

Each is based on our SCARS Team’s 31 plus years of experience.

SCARS Website Visitors get an Extra 10% Discount
Use Discount Code “romanacescamsnow” at Checkout

SCARS GREN BOOK - The SCARS STEPS Guide to Scam Victim Recovery
SCARS RED BOOK - Your Personal Scam Evidence & Crime Record Organizer
SCARS BLUE BOOK - Survivor's Recovery Journal
SCARS SLATE BOOK - A Guide For Families & Friends Of Scam Victims
SCARS LIME BOOK - Wisdom & Motivation for Scam Victims
SCARS CHERRY BOOK - A Guide To Understanding Your Fear
SCARS WORKBOOK - 8 Steps To Improvement
SCARS WORKBOOK - Understanding Self-Blame, Guilt, and Shame
100% of all profit goes to support FREE Scam Victims' Services

100% of all profit goes to help SCARS help more scam victims worldwide.

Your generous purchase allows us to maintain our scam avoidance, support, and recovery services. Please help SCARS and stand proud.

Always Report All Scams – Anywhere In The World To:

U.S. FTCFTC The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is an independent agency of the United States government whose principal mission is the enforcement of civil (non-criminal) U.S. antitrust law and the promotion of consumer protection. The FTC can also act as a clearinghouse for criminal reports sent to other agencies for investigation and prosecution. To learn more visit www.FTC.gov or to report fraud visit ReportFraud.FTC.gov at https://reportfraud.ftc.gov/#/?orgcode=SCARS and SCARS at www.Anyscams.com

Find Real Scammer & Fake Stolen Photos On ScamsONLINE.org
The SCARS Scammer Photo Gallery Website
Click Here To Donate To SCARS

Scroll to the bottom to leave a comment!

Your Feedback!

Please share your feedback below. Hearing from victims helps us refine our knowledge about scammer’s processes and methods, and then be able to better share factual authoritative information with victims worldwide. Please scroll down and share your thoughts and comments. What you think and experienced matters.

Please Share:

Please share our articles and knowledge with your friends & family. This is important!

Help others stay safe online – your knowledge can make the difference for both those being groomed and victims! The next victim might be your own family member or best friend!

SCARS the Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Incorporated

By the SCARS™ Editorial Team
Society of Citizens Against Relationship ScamsSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS. Inc.

A Worldwide Crime Victims Assistance & Crime Prevention Nonprofit Organization Headquartered In Miami Florida USA & Monterrey NL Mexico, with Partners In More Than 60 Countries
To Learn More, Volunteer, or Donate Visit: www.AgainstScams.org
Contact Us: Contact@AgainstScams.org

Latest & Updated SCARS RomanceScamsNow.com Posts:

SCARS Webinar: Money Mules

SCARS Webinar: Money MulesMoney mules Money mules are a type of money laundering where a person transfers illicit funds through a medium (such as a bank account) to obfuscate where the money came from. There are different types of money mules including witting, unwitting, and complicit. [VIDEO] Understanding How Victims Are [...]

The World Online Is Not Safe For Those That Don’t Know!

REPORT-BLOCK-RECOVER

The Issue Of Race In Scam Reporting
Click Here To Learn More!

FIND SCAMMER PHOTOS ON
SCARSONLINE.ORG

FIND SCARS ON FACEBOOK
CLICK HERE

Disclaimer:

SCARS IS A DIGITAL PUBLISHER AND DOES NOT OFFER HEALTH OR MEDICAL ADVICE, LEGAL ADVICE, FINANCIAL ADVICE, OR SERVICES THAT SCARS IS NOT LICENSED OR REGISTERED TO PERFORM.

IN MANY SCARS ARTICLES, WE MENTION TOPICS INCLUDING TRAUMATrauma Emotional and psychological trauma is the result of extraordinarily stressful events that shatter your sense of security, making you feel helpless in a dangerous world. Psychological trauma can leave you struggling with upsetting emotions, memories, and anxiety that won’t go away. It can also leave you feeling numb, disconnected, and unable to trust other people. Traumatic experiences often involve a threat to life or safety or other emotional shocks, but any situation that leaves you feeling overwhelmed and isolated can result in trauma, even if it doesn’t involve physical harm. It’s not the objective circumstances that determine whether an event is traumatic, but your subjective emotional experience of the event. The more frightened and helpless you feel, the more likely you are to be traumatized. Trauma requires treatment, either through counseling or therapy or through trauma-oriented support programs, such as those offered by SCARS., ABUSE, SELF-HARM, SUICIDALITY, RISKY BEHAVIORBehavior   Behavior / Behavioral Actions Otherwise known as habits, behavior or behavioral actions are strategies to help prevent online exploitation that target behavior, such as social engineering of victims. Changing your behavior is the ONLY effective means to reduce or prevent scams., DISORDERS, ADDICTION, AND OTHER PSYCHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS. THE INFORMATION IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH PROVIDERS WITH ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE.

IF YOU’RE FACING A MEDICAL EMERGENCY, CALL YOUR LOCAL EMERGENCY SERVICES IMMEDIATELY, OR VISIT THE NEAREST EMERGENCY ROOM OR URGENT CARE CENTER. YOU SHOULD CONSULT YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER BEFORE FOLLOWING ANY MEDICALLY RELATED INFORMATION PRESENTED ON OUR PAGES.

ALWAYS CONSULT A LICENSED ATTORNEY FOR ANY ADVICE REGARDING LEGAL MATTERS.

A LICENSED FINANCIAL OR TAX PROFESSIONAL SHOULD BE CONSULTED BEFORE ACTING ON ANY INFORMATION RELATING TO YOUR PERSONAL FINANCES OR TAX RELATED ISSUES AND INFORMATION.

This content and other material contained on the website, appsApps Applications or Apps An application (software), commonly referred to as an ‘app’ is a program on a computer, tablet, mobile phone or device. Apps are designed for specific tasks, including checking the weather, accessing the internet, looking at photos, playing media, mobile banking, etc. Many apps can access the internet if needed and can be downloaded (used) either for a price or for free. Apps are a major point of vulnerability on all devices. Some are designed to be malicious, such as logging keystrokes or activity, and others can even transport malware. Always be careful about any app you are thinking about installing., newsletter, and products (“Content”), is general in nature and for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical, legal, or financial advice; the Content is not intended to be a substitute for licensed or regulated professional advice. Always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider, lawyer, financial, or tax professional with any questions you may have regarding the educational information contained herein. SCARS makes no guarantees about the efficacy of information described on or in SCARS’ Content. The information contained is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible situations or effects. SCARS does not recommend or endorse any specific professional or care provider, product, service, or other information that may be mentioned in SCARS’ websites, apps, and Content unless explicitly identified as such.

The disclaimers herein are provided on this page for ease of reference. These disclaimers supplement and are a part of SCARS’ website’s Terms of Use

Legal Notices: 

All original content is Copyright © 1991 – 2021 Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. (D.B.A SCARS) All Rights Reserved Worldwide & Webwide. Third-party copyrights acknowledge.

SCARS, SCARS|INTERNATIONAL, SCARS, SCARS|SUPPORT, SCARS, RSN, Romance Scams Now, SCARS|INTERNATION, SCARS|WORLDWIDE, SCARS|GLOBAL, SCARS, Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams, Society of Citizens Against Romance Scams, SCARS|ANYSCAM, Project Anyscam, Anyscam, SCARS|GOFCH, GOFCH, SCARS|CHINA, SCARS|CDN, SCARS|UK, SCARS|LATINOAMERICA, SCARS|MEMBER, SCARS|VOLUNTEER, SCARS Cybercriminal Data Network, Cobalt Alert, Scam Victims Support GroupSupport Group In a support group, members provide each other with various types of help, usually nonprofessional and nonmaterial, for a particular shared, usually burdensome, characteristic, such as romance scams. Members with the same issues can come together for sharing coping strategies, to feel more empowered and for a sense of community. The help may take the form of providing and evaluating relevant information, relating personal experiences, listening to and accepting others' experiences, providing sympathetic understanding and establishing social networks. A support group may also work to inform the public or engage in advocacy. They can be supervised or not. SCARS support groups are moderated by the SCARS Team and or volunteers., SCARS ANGELS, SCARS RANGERS, SCARS MARSHALLS, SCARS PARTNERS, are all trademarks of Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc., All Rights Reserved Worldwide

Contact the law firm for the Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Incorporated by email at legal@AgainstScams.org

Share This Information - Choose Your Social Media!

Leave A Comment

Go to Top