(Last Updated On: March 24, 2022)

Phishy Emails Are Meant To Not Smell Fishy!

Guest Article by Dana Mantilla
President & Founder of Identity Protection Planning LLC. & Board of Directors, Better Business Bureau

When was the last time you opened your email and didn’t find a spam message by some Mr. Creepy?

PROBABLY NEVER!

You know this isn’t your Disneyworld and everybody is just used to it nowadays.

Most of us are aware of the online phishing attempts but we still fall prey even after smelling something tricky. Do you know why? It is because scammers like Mr. Creepy are a step ahead when it comes to tricking us with the way these emails are fashioned.

Just to be on the safer side, it is much better to take some time to review your emails than falling into the trap by clicking on it right away. When you receive an email, which asks you to:

  • Review and update your account information
  • Requests you to log in and change your password
  • ‘Click Here’ to collect your winnings or prize money

Stop right there! Do not click.

Upon receiving such requests, go to the company’s original website and contact them through the official details, and ask whether they need you to update your account information.

But what if you click through the email? Well, please don’t. You might be downloading malwareMalware Short for "malicious software," this term means computer viruses and other types of programs that cybercriminals use to disrupt or access your computer, typically with the aim of gathering sensitive files and accounts. onto your computer.

The bottom line is to take a few extra minutes to review each email. Look at the email address of who it says its it from, not just the name but the actual email address. Also hover over any links in the body of the email preview to see where the link will take you to.

If it smells PHISHY, it might be.

And even if it doesn’t, you still need to keep your guard and beware of those stinky, misleading spams.

To learn more about Identity protection

IPP was founded as an educational resource for clients to educate, organize and protect themselves from both online and offline potential identity theftIdentity Theft Identity theft is when someone uses another person's personal identifying information, without their permission, to commit fraud or other crimes. In both the U.K. and the United States it is the theft of personally identifiable information. Identity theft deliberately uses someone else's identity as a method to gain financial advantages or obtain credit and other benefits, and perhaps to cause other person's loss. The person whose identity has been stolen may suffer adverse consequences, especially if they are falsely held responsible for the perpetrator's actions. Personally identifiable information generally includes a person's name, date of birth, social security number, driver's license number, bank account or credit card numbers, PINs, electronic signatures, fingerprints, passwords, or any other information that can be used to access a person's financial resources. risks. IPP offers IDENTRON identity theft protection plans and insurance to businesses and associations that would like to both, offer ID protection to their clients and employees.

Always Report All ScamsScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. – Anywhere In The World To:

U.S. FTCFTC The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is an independent agency of the United States government whose principal mission is the enforcement of civil (non-criminal) U.S. antitrust law and the promotion of consumer protection. The FTC can also act as a clearinghouse for criminal reports sent to other agencies for investigation and prosecution. To learn more visit www.FTC.gov or to report fraud visit ReportFraud.FTC.gov at https://reportfraud.ftc.gov/#/?orgcode=SCARS and SCARSSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS. at www.Anyscams.com

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THE NEXT VICTIM MIGHT BE YOUR OWN FAMILY MEMBER OR BEST FRIEND!

SCARS the Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Incorporated

By the SCARS™ Editorial Team
Society of Citizens Against Relationship ScamsSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS. Inc.

A Worldwide Crime Victims Assistance & Crime Prevention Nonprofit Organization Headquartered In Miami Florida USA & Monterrey NL Mexico, with Partners In More Than 60 Countries
To Learn More, Volunteer, or Donate Visit: www.AgainstScams.org
Contact Us: Contact@AgainstScams.org

The Issue Of Race In ScamScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. Reporting
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