Last Updated on by SCARS Editorial Team

RSN™ Guide: 15 BASIC Warning Signs Of Romance Scamming

Back To The Basics Since New Victims Come Along Every Day!

THE FOLLOWING WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN 2011 – BUT THEIR TACTICS REMAIN THE SAME

Here are the Warning Signs to look out for with Romance ScamsScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost.:

  1. APPARENT AGE: Scammers use stolen photos from modeling sites and magazines, and military soldiers. Look at the apparent age of the person in the photo compared to the age in their profile.
  2. ASK FOR EMAIL OR TO COMMUNICATE PRIVATELY: Scammers often ask right away for your email address or they give you theirs right away. They want to communicate off the website as soon as possible.  By itself, not always the sign of a scammerScammer A Scammer or Fraudster is someone that engages in deception to obtain money or achieve another objective. They are criminals that attempt to deceive a victim into sending more or performing some other activity that benefits the scammer., but taken with other indicators can be.
  3. ALWAYS DOWN ON THEIR LUCK: Scammers tend to make hard-, “feel-sorry-for” stories and ask for help or money, or even get you to offer them money or help.
  4. THEY HAVE MILLIONS FOR JUST YOU: Scammers will offer you money. They will do this in order to gain your trust and send counterfeit checks, and this will get you in trouble with the banks.
  5. ARE EX-PATRIOTS: Scammers may say they are from your country but have lost their ID’s, have been arrested or injured while working in a foreign country. Then they will ask you to lend them money to get back home.  They may be trapped in a hotel, or have to bride an official, the list goes on and on.
  6. AFRICA IS POISON: Scammers are mostly from Africa, especially Nigeria. There are large companies, where people get paid for sitting and sending SCAMScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. MESSAGES all day to hard-working, innocent people. This is a huge business in Africa!
  7. WOMEN ARE TOO PRETTY: There are many members, who enter large numbers of fake profile photos of super-models, and women, who are drop-dead gorgeous. They use these profiles to lure men into falling in love and sending thousands of dollars to help them with medical, personal, or family problems, or even to pay for travel and visa fees to visit them. The photos are fake, and the girls are not real, well, even though they are real, they are not who you think they are, and you will never meet them.
  8. SCAMMER GRAMMARScammer Grammar Scammer Grammar (a term invented by the SCARS Team back in 2012) - is a writing style that is largely very bad English, bad grammar, mixed with West African slang and speech patterns. It is hard to define but easy to recognize when you see it. It is often referred to as Pidgin English, though this is not technically true. This most often shows when individual scammers (even if educated) try to improvise and create new written communications. Do a search on our website for SCAMMER GRAMMAR to find countless examples.: Scammers often write or speak very broken English (what we call “Scammer Grammar”) and use automated translators, making their profiles and language usage strange. Some examples:
    “ I rather nice girl. Have me to brown eyes, light hair. my size is 165 centimeters…. I like having wallpaper good for me of house. Of course I am work seriously. I like options. I sometimes be impatient, gender and happy. I see your technique at this site like and find it good” “i am god fearing man and like to find a woman that makes me really go crazy. and I want her to be with me asap”
  9. IMPROPER LANGUAGE: Scammers often don’t speak English at all and may not even know what to say. Sometimes they put the text they use to mass e-mail people as their profile description:
    “My name is John Williams, am 50 years, single and am from England. I saw your profile here and loved to be friends for a very long time and get to know you. I am operator and also father with a grown son. am searching for a real relationship and i cant resist getting to know you more and better. i want to meet you in person and talk more, we can talk more on yahoo ID. If you have, add me ……so we talk and get to know eachother more….i wait for you reply offline. my son say “daddy, you need someone after being alone all these years”…please talk to me, I wait for your reply. Love, John”.
  10. COPIED PROFILES / STOLEN IDENTITIES: Scammers may also copy some other users’ profiles, so they sound more realistic. They also use fake photos of models, or the photos of the people who sent them photos in the past.  If you suspect a scammer, just ask for a photo that day from their smartphone.  Ask for something specific, like the front of their house or their car.
  11. OVER COMPLEMENTARY: Scammers often write very flattering emails full of flirts and compliments to members completely out of their age range, especially to those, who stated that they are widows or really lonely.  By itself, this is not a true indicator, but again, taken with other clues is another red flag.
  12. TOO MUCH INFORMATION TOO FAST: Scammers try to build up trust upfront by giving you a lot of their personal information to make you comfortable in sharing yours. They also make up false first and last names in their profiles.
    Common names are like “John Williams”, “Greg Smi