Last Updated on by SCARS Editorial Team

Anti-ScamScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. FAQ: What Is A Phishing ScamPhishing scam Scammers often use email "phishing" to hook unsuspecting fraud victims. Treat all unsolicited email and spam as suspicious: Do not open or reply. To avoid loading malicious software onto your computer or device, never click a link – even from a trusted source – unless you've verified its authenticity. Be especially wary of emails asking for emergency funds or help from friends, family and colleagues. Their email accounts may have been hacked. Scammers will also pretend to be government agencies in scam emails.?

Answer:

“Phishing” is a type of identity theftIdentity Theft Identity theft is when someone uses another person's personal identifying information, without their permission, to commit fraud or other crimes. In both the U.K. and the United States it is the theft of personally identifiable information. Identity theft deliberately uses someone else's identity as a method to gain financial advantages or obtain credit and other benefits, and perhaps to cause other person's loss. The person whose identity has been stolen may suffer adverse consequences, especially if they are falsely held responsible for the perpetrator's actions. Personally identifiable information generally includes a person's name, date of birth, social security number, driver's license number, bank account or credit card numbers, PINs, electronic signatures, fingerprints, passwords, or any other information that can be used to access a person's financial resources. where criminals use email, websites, web forms, and even fake advertisements to try to bait you into giving your information away. You are asked to disclose confidential financial and personal information, like passwords, credit card numbers, Access Codes, or your National Identification card number. The most familiar type of phishing scam is an email threatening serious consequences if you do not log in and take action immediately.

Never respond to emails, open attachments, or click on suspicious links from unknown senders or even reputable institutions that ask for personal or financial information.

Always remember that no legitimate company will ever send you unsolicited emails asking for confidential information, such as your password, PIN, Access Code, credit card, and account numbers. No real business will ask you to validate or restore your account access through email or pop-up windows. The only time any business website or platform will ever ask for anything is when you register or feed to confirm your identity after requesting account changes.

If you have entered personal information after clicking on a link or suspect fraudulent behaviorBehavior   Behavior / Behavioral Actions Otherwise known as habits, behavior or behavioral actions are strategies to help prevent online exploitation that target behavior, such as social engineering of victims. Changing your behavior is the ONLY effective means to reduce or prevent scams., please change your passwords immediately, and notify the organization you have an account with that has been compromised.

Recognize it:

Some emails look authentic, featuring corporate logos and layouts similar to the ones used by institutions for legitimate communication. Because these emails can look so official, unsuspecting recipients may reply to them, resulting in financial losses, identity theft, and other fraudulent activity.

You should never respond to or action any email that:

  • Requires you to enter personal information directly into the email or submit that information online
  • Threatens to close or suspend your accounts if you do not provide or verify personal information
  • Claims that your account has been compromised or that there has been fraudulent activity on your account and requests you to enter, validate, or verify your account information
  • States that there are unauthorized charges on your account and requests your account information
  • Claims that the Bank has lost important security information and needs you to update your information online
  • Asks you to enter your card number, password, Access Code, or account numbers into an email, pop-up window, form, or non-secure webpage
  • Asks you to confirm, validate, verify, or refresh your account, credit card, or financial information

Preventative Measures:

  • Be suspicious of all unsolicited or unexpected emails you receive, even if they appear to originate from a trusted source like Scotiabank.
  • Never click on a link in an email or pop-up window to go to a site. Type or cut and paste the URL into a new Web browser window.
  • Type in the Web address yourself or search using Google to ensure you are transacting with the real company. You can also bookmark the URL to save time.
  • Never call a number appearing on an email you suspect is fraudulent. In a new twist, phishing scamsScams A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. use a phony telephone number in the email. When you call, a person or an automated response asks for your personal and/or account information.
  • If you do have a relationship with the company mentioned in the email, call the company using a phone number from a reputable source like your statement or the phone book.
  • Stay current. Read and follow Safe Computing Practices on a regular basis.