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SCARSSCARS SCARS - Society of Citizens Against Relationship Scams Inc. A government registered crime victims' assistance & crime prevention nonprofit organization based in Miami, Florida, U.S.A. SCARS supports the victims of scams worldwide and through its partners in more than 60 countries around the world. Incorporated in 2015, its team has 30 years of continuous experience educating and supporting scam victims. Visit www.AgainstScams.org to learn more about SCARS. On Facebook News & Information Items – Always Updating

More ScamScam A Scam is a confidence trick - a crime -  is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their trust through deception. Scams or confidence tricks exploit victims using their credulity, naïveté, compassion, vanity, irresponsibility, or greed and exploiting that. Researchers have defined confidence tricks as "a distinctive species of fraudulent conduct ... intending to further voluntary exchanges that are not mutually beneficial", as they "benefit con operators ('con men' - criminals) at the expense of their victims (the 'marks')". A scam is a crime even if no money was lost. & ScammerScammer A Scammer or Fraudster is someone that engages in deception to obtain money or achieve another objective. They are criminals that attempt to deceive a victim into sending more or performing some other activity that benefits the scammer. News

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Don't become a victim (again)!Stop talking to strangers online!Learn at www.romanceScamsNOW.com#onlinescars #Scammers #fraudsters #RomanceScams #ScamVictims #ScamRecovery #VictimRecovery #scars ... See MoreSee Less
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Are you thinking about online dating this holiday season?www.RomanceScamsNOW.com#onlinedating #catfish #youarethebait #scars #RomanceScams #ScamVictims #VictimRecovery ... See MoreSee Less
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Happier Holidays To Every Scam Victim!We can help scam victims to have Happier Holidays Ahead!We are SCARS and We Know How to help scam victims to recover after a Romance Scam!Start learning at www.RomanceScamsNOW.com & www.AgainstScams.orgDon't listen to amateurs and fakes! #SCARS #RomanceScams #ScamVictims #VictimRecovery ... See MoreSee Less
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The #SCARS Official Scammy™ Award Goes To The Dumb #Scammer Of The Week!Here is a fake profile where the scammer meant to say "Private" instead he said "Pervert" ... See MoreSee Less
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It's No Drama To Need Help!We are SCARS and We Know How to help scam victims to recovery after a Romance Scam!Start learning at www.RomanceScamsNOW.comDon't listen to amateurs and fakes! #scars #RomanceScams #ScamVictims #VictimRecovery ... See MoreSee Less
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Happy Holidays8 More #nigerian #Scammers #convicted and off to #prison ... See MoreSee Less
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7 More #Nigerian #fruadsters #convicted ... See MoreSee Less
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Happy Holidays from Scam Victims Around The World! The Internet Never Forgets7 More #Scammers #arrested in #nigeria ... See MoreSee Less
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The Internet Never Forgets!Two #nigerian #INTERNET #fraudsters #jailed ... See MoreSee Less
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Make sure you stop the traumaTrauma Emotional and psychological trauma is the result of extraordinarily stressful events that shatter your sense of security, making you feel helpless in a dangerous world. Psychological trauma can leave you struggling with upsetting emotions, memories, and anxiety that won’t go away. It can also leave you feeling numb, disconnected, and unable to trust other people. Traumatic experiences often involve a threat to life or safety or other emotional shocks, but any situation that leaves you feeling overwhelmed and isolated can result in trauma, even if it doesn’t involve physical harm. It’s not the objective circumstances that determine whether an event is traumatic, but your subjective emotional experience of the event. The more frightened and helpless you feel, the more likely you are to be traumatized. Trauma requires treatment, either through counseling or therapy or through trauma-oriented support programs, such as those offered by SCARS. and get the help you need!#PTSD at a Glance:Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental healthMental health Mental health, defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is "a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community". According to WHO, mental health includes "subjective well-being, perceived self-efficacy, autonomy, competence, intergenerational dependence, and self-actualization of one's intellectual and emotional potential, among others". From the perspectives of positive psychology or of holism, mental health may include an individual's ability to enjoy life and to create a balance between life activities and efforts to achieve psychological resilience. Cultural differences, subjective assessments, and competing professional theories all affect how one defines "mental health". condition that can occur after experiencing a traumatic event. Approximately 18% of ALL HUMANS (per WHO) will experience PTSD at some point in their life, with the condition more common among women.Although PTSD (#Trauma) is sometimes attributed to veterans, it can be caused by any traumatic event, including physical, emotional, or sexual abuse, natural disasters, crime, or medical trauma.There are many different treatment options for PTSD, including therapy, medications, and lifestyle changes, and clinical research studies continue to identify new options.What Is Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is among the most common mental health conditions in the United States. PTSD can develop after experiencing a traumatic event such as physical, emotional, or sexual abuse, crime, motor vehicle accidents, a natural disaster, or medical trauma, among others. Not everyone who experiences trauma will develop PTSD, and it’s not uncommon for the symptoms to appear months or sometimes years after the trauma has ended. You may already know about some of the stereotypical symptoms associated with PTSD, like flashbacksFLASHBACKS A flashback is reexperiencing a previous traumatic experience as if it were actually happening in that moment. It includes reactions that often resemble the client’s reactions during the trauma. Flashback experiences are very brief and typically last only a few seconds, but the emotional aftereffects linger for hours or longer. Flashbacks are commonly initiated by a trigger, but not necessarily.. Flashbacks cause people to feel like they are re-experiencing traumatic events — they lose awareness of the present and it feels like they are back in time. Flashbacks are part of a group of PTSD symptoms known as intrusive symptoms. Other intrusive PTSD experiences can include recurrent and involuntary memories of your trauma or distressing dreams. PTSD can cause many other symptoms, and not everyone will experience flashbacks or intrusive symptoms. Other common experiences people with PTSD have can include avoiding triggersTRIGGERS A trigger is a stimulus that sets off a memory of a trauma or a specific portion of a traumatic experience. or reminders of the traumatic event. People with PTSD may avoid people and places associated with trauma, but sometimes the triggers are more subtle. For example, you may also avoid objects (like a certain color of clothing), activities, or conversations that remind you of the trauma. Some people with PTSD also experience dissociation, where they feel detached from their surroundings or even their body. Some people with PTSD may also forget or unconsciously blockBlock Blocking is a technical action usually on social media or messaging platforms that restricts or bans another profile from seeing or communicating with your profile. To block someone on social media, you can usually go to their profile and select it from a list of options - often labeled or identified with three dots ••• out parts of their traumatic experiences.Other symptoms of PTSD mimic other mental health conditions like depression and anxiety. People with PTSD may lose interest in activities they once loved, have difficulty sleeping, feel more irritable or angry, startle easily, have trouble concentrating, and experience constant hypervigilanceHypervigilance Hypervigilance is when the nervous system is not correctly filtering sensory information and the individual is in an enhanced state of sensory sensitivity. This appears to be linked to a dysregulated nervous system which can often be caused by traumatic events or PTSD. Normally, the nervous system releases stress signals in certain situations as a defense mechanism to protect people from perceived dangers. In some cases, the nervous system becomes chronically dysregulated, causing a release of stress signals that are inappropriate to the situation and create inappropriate and exaggerated responses. Hypervigilance may bring about a state of increased anxiety which can cause exhaustion. Other symptoms include: abnormally increased arousal, a high responsiveness to stimuli, and a constant scanning of the environment., sometimes described as “waiting for the other shoe to drop.” Sometimes the symptoms of PTSD go beyond what’s traditionally considered PTSD and may include additional symptoms like difficulty regulating emotions, significant distrust of the world, suicidal ideation, and feeling different or separate from other people. This is referred to as complex post-traumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) and is more common among people who have survived chronic or ongoing trauma at some point in their life.A romance scam and its aftermath qualifies as an ongoing traumatic experience.Many of you have this. Are you getting professional help? Are you participating in your own recovery?If you are committed to your recovery we recommend the following steps:1. First end the scam. Read our 3 Steps for New Scam Victims here: romancescamsnow.com/dating-scams/scars-3-steps-for-new-scam-victims/2. Find a local qualified TRAUMA Counselor or Therapist. Here is a directory: www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapists/trauma-and-ptsd3. You can join a real professionally moderated scam victims' support groupSupport Group In a support group, members provide each other with various types of help, usually nonprofessional and nonmaterial, for a particular shared, usually burdensome, characteristic, such as romance scams. Members with the same issues can come together for sharing coping strategies, to feel more empowered and for a sense of community. The help may take the form of providing and evaluating relevant information, relating personal experiences, listening to and accepting others' experiences, providing sympathetic understanding and establishing social networks. A support group may also work to inform the public or engage in advocacy. They can be supervised or not. SCARS support groups are moderated by the SCARS Team and or volunteers.. Here is one of the SCARS Support GroupsSupport Groups In a support group, members provide each other with various types of help, usually nonprofessional and nonmaterial, for a particular shared, usually burdensome, characteristic, such as romance scams. Members with the same issues can come together for sharing coping strategies, to feel more empowered and for a sense of community. The help may take the form of providing and evaluating relevant information, relating personal experiences, listening to and accepting others' experiences, providing sympathetic understanding and establishing social networks. A support group may also work to inform the public or engage in advocacy. They can be supervised or not. SCARS support groups are moderated by the SCARS Team and or volunteers. for English language victims: www.facebook.com/groups/SCARS.Avoidance.Information.Public.GroupMake sure you stop the trauma and get the help you need!#PostTraumaticStressDisorder #TraumaCounseling #TraumaTherapy #SupportGroup #SCARS #ScamVictims #RomanceScams #RomanceScamVictim ... See MoreSee Less
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